it is for that smile and for those tears that I work

 

Bowl by Rupert Spira

Cézanne said, “A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution.”

The purpose of his art was to trigger this revolution, this complete ‘about turn’ in the way we see ourselves and the world.  On another occasion he said the purpose of art was to “give us a taste of Nature’s Eternity,” that is, to give us a taste of that which is ever-present in the experience of nature or indeed in any experience.

Insofar as my work as an artist has a motive or a function, I share Cézanne’s vision although not, alas, his talent!

Just as the essence of all thought is understanding and the essence of all relationship or friendship is love, so the essence of all perception is beauty.

Therefore the highest function or motive of an object is to point towards or reveal this Beauty, that is, in Cézanne’s words, to give a taste of Nature’s Eternity.

A work of art is a work that comes from this intuition and that, as a result, bears the signature of its origin. The potency of art is that it bypasses the rational mind, that is, it is not abstract.  It delivers intravenously, so to speak.

Many years ago I saw a man standing in front of one of my bowls at an exhibition.  When I returned twenty minutes later he was still there just looking.

As I approached him he turned round and I saw that tears were streaming down his face.  He smiled and left.

It is for that smile and for those tears that I work.

– Rupert Spira


Source – http://www.rupertspira.com/

See also http://www.theawakenedeye.com/artisans/spira.htm/

and http://www.theawakenedeye.com/natureseternity1.htm/


Cézanne and the art of nondual nonfinito

 

Or – getting emptiness exactly right

 

Paul Cézanne La Montagne Sainte-Victoire vue des Lauves

La Montagne Sainte Victoire vue des Lauves, Paul Cézanne, 1901-1906

 

As Cézanne aged, his paintings became filled by more and more naked canvas, what he eloquently called nonfinito. No one had ever done this before. The painting was clearly incomplete. How could it be art? But Cézanne was unfazed by his critics. He knew that his paintings were only literally blank. Their incompleteness was really a metaphor for the process of sight. In these unfinished canvases, Cézanne was trying to figure out what the brain would finish for him. As a result, his ambiguities are exceedingly deliberate, his vagueness predicated on precision. If Cézanne wanted us to fill in his empty spaces, then he had to get his emptiness exactly right.

For example, look at Cézanne’s watercolors of Mont Sainte-Victoire. In his final years, Cézanne walked every morning to the crest of Les Lauves, where an expansive view of the Provençal plains opened up before him. He would paint in the shade of a linden tree. From there, Cézanne said, he could see the land’s hidden patterns, the way the river and vineyards were arranged in overlapping planes. In the background was always the mountain; that jagged isosceles of rock that seemed to connect the dry land with the infinite sky….

And yet the mountain does not disappear. It is there, an implacable and adamant presence. The mind easily invents the form that Cézanne’s paint barely insinuates. Although the mountain is almost literally invisible – Cézanne has only implied its presence – its looming gravity anchors the painting. We don’t know where the painting ends and we begin…

– Jonah Lehrer: Proust was a Neuroscientist


Source – http://www.selfdiscoveryportal.com/Conquest.htm
PS – The entire article is well worth reading.