every maker knows the feel of love

 

Every maker knows the feel of Love.

 

It’s the upsurge of

JOY

in your heart
when your gaze falls upon
your makings,
the makings born of an innocent mind

{ BEGINNER’S MIND }

and finds them pleasing.
And you wonder where they came from,
how they happened;
you listen closely as they whisper their story,
the story you had no intention
of telling – indeed, you never knew
until now, until your hands
tentatively, tenderly birthed its expression

IN THE DARK

 

And if your makings have no toe-hold
in the art market…?
Perhaps it’s all the better.
Then you know you’re on your true way,
(not merely a clone, a follower of fashion)
immune to the bleating of the corralled sheep
who claim to know what “real art” should look like.

You stand in your authenticity,
honesty,
impeccability.

You find you don’t mind
that your makings hold no commercial value,
have no relevance to the commodified art scene.

 

You know only one thing matters:
your devotion to

LOVE

You smile at your makings; you nod
knowing that regardless of the titles you gave them
their true name is Love
and they are part of a series that has no end.

 

Every maker knows the feel of Love.

 


Miriam Louisa Simons, Refuge Robe

 Refuge Robe, acrylics, pastels, metallic pigments, loose textured canvas, steel gauze
Private Collection. An offering made for dear friends who gave me shelter during troubled times.


The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.
Carl Jung


I play with color: I love the subtle way it moves and the mystery of its interactions. I love tonal gradations.

I play with texture: I love the way texture reveals light, creates form.

Since color and texture are the agencies of light, I guess that means I play with light: I am a lover of LIGHT.

What is the feel of your Love? What do you love to play with?


 

blessed are the painters of the sublime light

Deborah Barlow: O R B I L I N I A

JMW Turner: TURNER FROM THE TATE


 

Deborah Barlow - Peridawna

Deborah Barlow, Peridawna, detail

Orbilinia is a series of abstract paintings that explores the nature of otherworldliness. Rarefied, meditative and serene, they hang together to round out a suggestive sense of celestial sanctuary and sacred retreat. Complex and meticulously layered, their atmospheric materiality shows no trace of brushes or traditional painting tools. Their surfaces grow by slow accretion similar to the way nature marks the land, with each layer exposing as well as veiling its elements.
– Orbilinia website

Deborah Barlow: O R B I L I N I A – A PAINTING INSTALLATION

March 11 through March 16, 2013. An opening and artist reception will be held on Tuesday, March 12, from 5-8PM.
The public is invited to attend.

Woodbury Museum
575 E. University Parkway N250
Orem UT 84097
801.863.4200

ORBILINIA website
Deborah Barlow
Slow Muse


 

JMW Turner - Sun Setting over a Lake

J M W Turner, Sun Setting over a Lake (c 18400)

Turner was supreme …  in his response to real places. In the notebooks and in the many watercolours of sites in Britain, Switzerland or Italy, he is able to see and to reveal to us something that all too often remains invisible before our very eyes: the wholeness and life of nature manifested in the light that dissolves all particular things into unity.
– Christoper Allen in The Weekend Australian

TURNER FROM THE TATE: The Making of a Master

To May 19
Art Gallery of South Australia
North Terrace  Adelaide SA 5000
(08) 8207 7000


and then along came Lu

 

Miriam Louisa Simons: detail from scroll - Lu

Lu,  220 x 220 

Detail from scroll  (980 x 355)
torn khadi papers, stainless steel gauze, acrylic paints
lurex threads, textured canvas, ceramic tile fragment

 

I dug out my Zen and Taoist texts, poked around online encyclopedialand, and found that Mu and Ku are Japanese words with – to the uninitiated – apparently similar meaning.

Mu: lit. nothing.  Space, emptiness, clearness, transparency.

Ku: lit. sky, space, mouth.  Three-dimensional void, sunyata, emptiness.

Wu is a Chinese Taoist word.  Lit. not have, without.  Commonly used to indicate not-being, creative quietude, letting-be.  Not too far out of step with Mu and Ku, it seems to me.

Then I looked up Lu.  Unsurprisingly it’s a shortening of Louisa, and guess what?  It means famous warrior and light.  I don’t know about the warrior bit, but I love the light.

And I love the way my work teaches me all I need to know.


a kakemono called ku


life on the via creativa

My version of the via creativa isn’t a paved path.  It’s a journey.  The path opens up beneath one’s feet as one wonders about and explores the possibilities presented by life.  Life as-it-is, here and now, in this very moment.

I’m in awe of the movement of the via creativa in my life.  If I’m open and my mind isn’t yapping away telling me what I should do and how it should look, amazing ideas and possibilities arise.  Connections happen.  Questions form themselves.  Wonderingmind flowers.

Many years ago I studied traditional and contemporary textile surface design in Japan.  I often used shibori dyeing techniques in my work – both in wearable art and wall pieces.  Here’s an example of an early work:

 

ebbing---Leigh

ebbing : Leigh
900 x 550
arashi shibori, stitching, canvas, washi, silk cords, found object

 

In my notes for this piece I wrote:

I spent the winter of 1987 in a sleepy village called Leigh on the Pacific Coast.  The cottage overlooked the harbour where small fishing boats and yachts would anchor, and the water view reached over to Little Barrier Island.  The pattern produced by the arashi process brings to mind the ripples on the tide as well as the patterns left in the sand by the ebbing tide.

Years later I was fossicking through fabric scraps and came upon some more bits of the arashi shibori cloth I’d dyed during those years.

 

arashi

 

Hmmmm.  Wonderingmind liked the patterns; the way the indigo dye flowed in softly graduated tones from dark to light.  I’d been painting with acrylics more recently, layering them on textured canvas in a technique I call making love with light (thank you Daido Loori, Roshi).  Wonderingmind asked: what if the arashi patterns were transferred to canvas and I played with light upon them?